Fluid/Rock Interactions in Canada’s Geothermal Systems

The purpose of this project is to understand physical and chemical interactions between geothermal fluids and geothermal reservoir rocks.  Geothermal fluids include hydrothermal water, basin brines and engineered geofluids such as captured supercritical CO2.  Reservoir rocks of interest are carbonates, sandstones and crystalline rocks.  Research will involve determining the kinetics of fluid/rock chemical reactions at reservoir conditions, the effects these reactions will have on the long term productivity of the reservoir, and the risks these reactions may pose to industrial infrastructure.


Faculty and academic staff involved in this project include:

Jonathan Banks (EAS): experimental geochemistry; geochemical modeling


Dan Alessi (EAS): Brine geochemistry; brine analytical chemistry


Ben Rostron (EAS): Flow modeling


Rick Chalaturnyk (CivE): Geomechanics; cross-over to CO2 theme

Publications, Activities, and Awards

  • Characterizing Deep Basin Siliciclastic Reservoirs for Geothermal Use Near Hinton, Alberta
  • Completed Lab Renovations
  • Dynamic geothermal reservoir modeling in the Clarke Lake Gas Field, NE British Columbia
  • Geothermal resource characterization of the Slave Point Formation at Clarke Lake Field, B.C., Canada
  • Geothermal resource characterization of the Slave Point Formation at Clarke Lake Field, B.C., Canada
  • Geothermal Theme Website
  • Hired Therme Adminstrator
  • Lab Equipment Installation
  • Petrophysical Characterization of a Geothermal Reservoir near Hinton, Alberta
  • Ross River Geothermal Well Drilling
  • Sedimentary Basin Geothermal Favourabiity Mapping and Power Generation Assessments.
  • Techno-economic Assessment of Geothermal Energy Resources in the Sedimentary Basin in Northeastern British Columbia
  • Using Oil and Gas Data to Estimate Geothermal Resources in Sedimentary Basing: A Case Study from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin